Corticosteroid cream potency

Even though topical corticosteroids such as creams or ointments are applied to the surface of the skin, they can still cause side effects . Long-term use or excessive use can lead to thinning of the skin, irritation, dryness, or changes in skin color. If your doctor recommends that you occlude your psoriasis areas -- wrapping them in plastic after applying a topical corticosteroid to boost the effect -- side effects may be more common. More serious side effects may occur with topical corticosteroids if used in high doses for prolonged periods. You may become resistant to the helpful effects of topical corticosteroids over time, too.

Systemic corticosteroids can reactivate tuberculosis and should not be used in patients with a history of active tuberculosis, except when chemoprophylaxis is instituted concomitantly. The incidence or course of acute bacterial infection are probably minimally affected by inhaled triamcinolone. Application of topical corticosteroids to areas of infection, including tuberculosis of the skin, should be initiated or continued only if the appropriate antiinfective treatment is instituted. If the infection does not respond to the antimicrobial therapy, the concurrent use of the topical corticosteroid should be discontinued until the infection is controlled.

In controlled clinical trials involving 319 subjects, the incidence of adverse reactions associated with the use of Mometasone Furoate Cream % was %. Reported reactions included burning, pruritus, and skin atrophy. Reports of rosacea associated with the use of Mometasone Furoate Cream % have also been received. In controlled clinical trials (n=74) involving pediatric subjects 2 to 12 years of age, the incidence of adverse experiences associated with the use of Mometasone Furoate Cream % was approximately 7%. Reported reactions included stinging, pruritus, and furunculosis.

The following adverse reactions were reported to be possibly or probably related to treatment with Mometasone Furoate Cream % during clinical trials in 4% of 182 pediatric subjects 6 months to 2 years of age: decreased glucocorticoid levels, 2; paresthesia, 2; folliculitis, 1; moniliasis, 1; bacterial infection, 1; skin depigmentation, 1. The following signs of skin atrophy were also observed among 97 subjects treated with Mometasone Furoate Cream % in a clinical trial: shininess, 4; telangiectasia, 1; loss of elasticity, 4; loss of normal skin markings, 4; thinness, 1; and bruising, 1.

Corticosteroid cream potency

corticosteroid cream potency

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